PACIC Survey

In defining six aims for transforming healthcare in America, the Institute of Medicine Quality Chasm Report declared "patient centeredness" a central feature of quality, along with safety, promptness, effectiveness, efficiency and equity. Patient centeredness may be a first principle that can provide a lens to focus action, and as such can be used as the guide for achieving all six aims.

Historically, patient centeredness has been regarded as the assessment of needs and preferences to consider social and cultural factors affecting the clinical encounter or compliance with treatment. There is a growing consensus that patients have a more active role to play in defining and reforming healthcare, particularly in chronic disease management, where patients provide the majority of care in day-to-day management of their illness.

Two versions:  The 20-item PACIC and the 26-item PACIC+
The Patient Assessment of Care for Chronic Conditions (PACIC) measures specific actions or qualities of care, congruent with the CCM, that patients report they have experienced in the delivery system. The survey includes 20 items, and should be sufficiently brief to use in many settings. When paired with the ACIC, these tools can provide complementary consumer and provider assessments of important aspects of care for chronic illness patients.  The results of our validation study of the PACIC were published in 2005.

The Patient Assessment of Care for Chronic Conditions+ (PACIC+, 26 items) includes the same 20 items as the PACIC in the five domains (Patient Activation, Delivery System Design, Decision Support, Goal Setting/Tailoring, Problem-Solving/Contextual, and Follow-up/Coordination) with the addition of a sixth domain, Multi-disciplinary Team Functions.